National First Foot Day

National First Foot Day

Who would have thought that the New Year’s Day’s first visitor to a house could set the tone for the year? The tradition of celebrating National First Foot Day dates back to more than 1000 years. Invading Vikings may have brought First Foot to Scotland, Cumbria and Northern England. People on the Isle of Man also celebrate National First Foot Day. This tradition is believed to have been passed down through folklore. The idea that the first person to enter a house on New Year’s Day brings good fortune for the whole year. Many believe this tradition was established because many Scots had to work during Christmas. They moved their celebrations into the New Year and included National First Foot Day. However, there are some variations in how National First Food Day is celebrated. The idea is that the tallest male should be the one to cross the threshold. It is preferable for the male to have dark hair, but in some cases it may be better. Folklore says that the person crossing the threshold first must not be a woman. However, in some cases it may be better if he is dark-haired. If there is a party at your house on New Years Eve, you should get out of the house before the clock strikes midnight. This will bring good luck to the house for the year ahead. The first-foot can return to the house when the clock strikes midnight, which will bring good fortune for the coming year. Robert Burns used an existing tune in 1788 and added his own lyrics. Robert Burns, a well-known Scotsman and poet, made it a tradition to sing the song at New Year’s Eve celebrations.

The event is finished.

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